Category Archives: – QUOTE #

quote #7

We have global time, belonging to the multimedia, to cyberspace, increasingly dominating the local time-frame of our cities, our neighborhoods. Nothing is ever obtained without a loss of something else. What will be gained from electronic information and electronic communication will necessarily result in a loss somewhere else. If we are not aware of this loss, and do not account for it, our gain will be of no value. This is the lesson to be had from the previous development of transport technologies. The realization of high velocity railway service has been possible only because engineers of the 19th century had invented the block system, that is a method to regulate traffic so that trains are speeded up without risk of railway catastrophes. But so far, traffic control engineering on the information (super)highways is conspicuous by its absence.

Paul Virilio in  SPEED – ISSUE 003 (2011) by Lodown Magazine, via

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under - QUOTE #, ISSUE Ø7 - SERIES

quote #6


seen at Rax Alp, Austria

[…] Geography and space are always gendered, always raced, always economical and always sexual. The textures that bind them together are daily re-written through a word, a gaze, a gesture. […]

*Rogoff, Irit (2000). Terra Infirma: Geography`s Visual Culture. London: Routledge, p.28.

Leave a comment

Filed under - QUOTE #, ISSUE Ø7 - SERIES

quote #5

[…] How many maps, in the descriptive or geographical sense, might be needed to deal exhaustively with a given space, to code and decode all its meanings and contents? It is doubtful whether a finite number can ever be given in answer to this sort of question. […]

*Lefebvre, Henri (1991). The Production of Space. London: Blackwell Publishing, p.85.

Leave a comment

Filed under - QUOTE #, ISSUE Ø7 - SERIES

quote #4





[…] Wie (nämlich jene Lebewesen, die Organismus heißen) sind Röhren, durch deren eine Öffnung die Welt hineinfließt, um durch die andere wieder hinauszufließen. Das heißt: es gibt für uns ein Vorne (Schlund) und ein Hinten (After). Die meisten von uns sind symmetrisch gebaut, aber nicht eigentlich rund um die Röhre, sondern entlang der Röhre.
Das heißt: die meisten von uns können zwischen rechts und links unterscheiden (allerdings gilt dies nicht für die vielen Seesterne und die einseitigen Schnecken, um nur zwei Beispiele zu nennen). Ursprünglich sind wir wohl alle im Sand der Brandung eines Kambrischen Meers nach vorn und nach hinten gekrochen: der Name für lebende Röhren ist ja Würmer. Von den Dimensionen >oben und unten< ist bei so einem Kriechen eigentlich keine Rede. Nur haben sich einige von uns vom Boden abgestoßen (zum Beispiel Vögel und Insekten), und andere haben sich aufgerichtet, obwohl sie am Boden blieben (zum Beispiel Kopffüßler und Menschen). Für die sich abgestoßen habenden Würmer haben sich aus >vorn-hinten< und >rechts-links< Fächer von zusätzlichen Dimensionen geöffnet, zum Beispiel >rechts-unten< oder >oben-vorn<. Für die aufgerichteten, kleben gebliebenen Würmer sind es nicht Dimensionsfächer, sondern eher Dimensionsachsen, die sich geöffnet haben: ein Achsenkreuz eben.
Und damit ist der sogenannte Lebensraum beschrieben. Alle anderen Räume sind Abstraktionen davon. […]*

*Vilém Flusser. Räume. (1991) In: Dünne Jörg; Günzel Stephan (Hrsg.). Raumtheorie. Frankfurt/ Main: Suhrkamp (2004)

Leave a comment

Filed under - QUOTE #, ISSUE Ø7 - SERIES

quote #3


Hamburg, Beim Grünen Jäger, 2010, seen with Leica R7

[…] The marking and manifestation of shared memories in city spaces have recently entered a new and expensive realm. On the one hand, cities attempt to position themselves as brands – increasingly thought through and packaged as cultural events and destinations. This has been accelerated by cultural policies that support the construction of regional identities often through recurring activities – art biennales, music fairs and theatre festivals. […]And, on the other hand, groups and individuals are using new technologies – digital cameras, websites, print-on-demand publishing – to examine, produce, circulate and archive their own memories of place. Often working at an informal and personal level, they unearth recollections and reconfigure significant shared histories that have been frequently misunderstood or excluded from dominant narratives. The shift towards focusing on localised or individual experiences allows for a reframing of prevailing accounts and for a counter-discourse to emerge. […]*

*Naik, Deepa;  Oldfield, Trenton(2009). Introduction: Public Memory. In: Naik, Deepa;  Oldfield, Trenton (Eds.). Critical Cities, Volume 1. London: Myrdle Court Press, pp. 170-198


1 Comment

Filed under - QUOTE #, ISSUE Ø7 - SERIES