Category Archives: – VISUAL ME #

visual me #21


installation view: Susanne Bisovsky


Just a short note to all my German-speaking readers: Read my latest article on AUSTRIANFASHION.NET concerning the conference fashionable Queens, that took place at University of Vienna on December 3&4, 2010.
International experts reflecting on the visual representation of powerful women with a focus on fashion.
And yes, Ladies – and of course Gentlemen – fashion as a cultural technique of presentation needs an intellectual discourse in a world which is increasingly build on visual power.

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visual me #20



photo of Vienna Art Week 2010, magazine


Vienna Art Weeks 2010 (November 15 and 21)  is getting off the starting blocks: The magazine is already out, displaying the under-representation of women in Vienna`s cultural landscape on one of its introductory pages. Among the twenty leaders who are commenting on the city`s cultural and economical qualities, a number of five (!) women occupy central positions – (this is a rate of 25%): Sabine Folie [Generali Foundation], Sabine Haag [Kunsthistorisches Museum], Agnes Husslein-Arco [Belvedere], Karola Kraus [MUMOK] and Inge Scholz-Strasser [ Sigmund Freud Museum].

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visual me #19


Zaha Hadid reflecting on women, discrimination, support and other challenges in architecture. Produced for JO magazine.

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visual me #18



Some people call Agnès Varda the “grandmother of Nouvelle Vague“: For Les réponses des femmes (1975) she obtained a César Award in the category Best Documentation Short Film. Get more information on her exclusion of a male-dominated film industry or the discussion whether she can be regarded as a feminist film-maker or not at senses of cinema.

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visual me #17



An essential source for social analysis of visual codes is Erving Goffman`s Gender Advertisements (1979). His contribution to the study of advertising in general and gender expectations in particular reveals that despite the fact that visual representations in advertisements are exaggerated, this does not mean they do not have an influence on our everyday life. Goffman discusses the coding rules of gender representations entering into the question of the direct effects they have on our bodies and behaviour. Besides this publication tremendously shows what can emerge between social sciences and visual imagery.
Download the book at public collectors or buy it  @amazon.

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